Valneri says:

(October 29, 2012.)

Hi, I am a new follower who found you thgoruh the Hoppin Weekend Blog Hop. I love to find new blogs to follow, so I'm looking forward to following yours. If you are able, I appreciate a follow back ~ I'm still a new blogger and a growing blog is a happy blog!Thank you!~KerrieLynn ღ

Noah says:

(October 29, 2012.)

First, I'm a third party who happened to notcie this information. I believe some readers of WUWT will be good candidates for the position. The opportunity may be separately posted elsewhere by the government, but this RFQ is only available through the GSA eBuy site to my knowledge. Job posting:Our government at work:The GSA has posted a requirement for a field research scientist (Geologist) to find and analyze charcoal for paleoclimate research. The posting is suited to an employee of a company with an established PES or LOGWORLD contract (with GSA). Anyone interested should see if their employer has one or both of those contracts, and they employer should know how to access the RFQ and pull down the statement of work (PWS yes, PWS, go figure). RFQ ID: RFQ639692RFQ Title: Scientist Category: 70: 132 51 , 736: 736 5 , 899: 899 1 , 871: 871 2RFQ Issue Date: 12/09/2011 12:27:03 PM EST Contact: JUDY DAVISDepartment of the InteriorReply to and questions to: jmdavis[insertsymbolhere]usgs.gov RFQ Close Date: 12/14/2011 01:00:00 PM EST (Time Remaining: 4D 23H 44M)Delivery: Period of performance: 01/01/2012 through 12/31/2012 (PWS and award will supersede).Description: Full time employee, 40 hours a week, Monday to Friday excluding Holidays. (Five years, actually.)Buyer Documents: Performance based physical scientist.doc Quote ID: RFQ639692-XXX The USGS Geology and Geophysics Science Center has been conducting research related to Holocene environmental change in both western North America and Central America and comparing them with other paleoclimate records and proxies to improve our understanding of regional and extra-regional climate dynamics and drivers. These records will document the natural variability inherent to these ecosystems over the last 1,000 – 10,000 years. This research will also provide information on changes in fire frequency and intensity over time. In particular, we will evaluate how fire regimes have changed over last few centuries and millennia under a changing climate regime.[...]physical scientist specialized in analysis of fossil charcoal records to assist with research on the climatic and ecosystem history of Guatemala and the western United States.